LP_ 20150929_To70_0069

03 Mar A new noise calculation method for Schiphol Airport

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The Dutch government is currently implementing the European “Standard Method of Computing Noise Contours Around Civil Airports” (ECAC Doc29). The implementation of the latest version of ECAC Doc29 was invigorated by a recent conclusion from The Netherlands commission for environmental assessments stating that the current model has to be improved or replaced.

The new method includes the latest insights in the field of aircraft noise modelling and will replace the current outdated noise calculation model used at Schiphol . Integrating airport-specific landing & take-off characteristics is considered to be an important factor of the implementation of ECAC Doc29 at Schiphol. This will ensure a more realistic noise model in comparison to combining ECAC Doc29 with ANP standard flight profiles.

The noise model is embedded in the environmental regulations for Schiphol. The annual noise exposure is determined based on actual traffic and flight paths and compared to maximum noise levels based on traffic scenarios. Furthermore, the planning and management of land use is based on noise contours, and noise abatement procedures are evaluated using the model.

Due to the firm embedment of the model in the environmental regulations, the noise model has to reflect the real situation in the best possible way and incorporate the latest knowledge on aircraft noise modelling.  The adoption of a new model has to be performed with a great deal of care. Its success is crucial for a variety of stakeholders. A highly studious implementation using the latest insights and operations specific to Schiphol is being done in order to safeguard the interests of all relevant parties.

To70’s experience in aircraft noise calculation ranges from local effects to involvement at European level in the ACI Noise Task Force. The Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment (IenM) has awarded To70 the task of co-shaping the new model and verifying its implementation . To70 will further be involved to ensure a fair transition to the new model and the upcoming environmental assessment for Schiphol Airport.

About To70. To70 was founded in The Netherlands in 2000 and has since expanded with offices in Europe, Australia, Asia and Latin-America. Our clients include airports, airlines, governments and air navigation service providers. At to70 we believe that society’s demand for transport and mobility can be met in a safe, efficient, environmentally friendly and economically viable manner. To achieve this, policy and business decisions have to be based on objective information. With our diverse team of specialists and generalists to70 provides pragmatic solutions and expert advice, based on high-quality data-driven analyses.

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Kjeld Vinkx
Kjeld Vinkx
I have joined To70 in 2003 and now jointly manage our Dutch office and aim to contribute to become the best global aviation consultants. I have a strong focus on data driven analysis, strategic advice and providing solutions that work. By delivering outstanding research and consultancy services, To70 enables aviation and society to cope with the challenges for airport and airspace operations.
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